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» Articles » Plants » Pothos: Attractive And Undemanding Houseplant

Pothos: Attractive And Undemanding Houseplant

by Douglas L. Bishop on 8/16/2015 13:40


Here’s another easy-to-grow houseplant for the home gardener.

And, even though it is commonly thought of only as a houseplant, pothos also works great outside your home in containers or hanging baskets, provided temperatures are not too extreme.

A start of pothos is almost always available at your local garden center and is usually priced very inexpensively. If you’re new to plant-keeping, this is the perfect plant with which to begin your gardening adventure.

Pothos is very undemanding of growing conditions--it needs moderate watering and filtered sunlight, and will grow in less than perfect conditions of soil fertility.

The leaves of pothos are of a classic heart shape in form, and range in color from dark green to yellow to variegated colorations of yellows, whites, and paler shades of green.

It doesn’t take long for pothos to assume its trailing vine posture, often spilling willfully over the sides of your hanging basket and cascading merrily along on its showy way.

If the tendrils start to get out of hand with their lengthiness or legginess, don’t hesitate to cut back the over-eager strands of your pothos. This pruning will help your plant assume a “bushier” more desirable fullness.

And, the cuttings you take will then be an ideal and no-cost source of new plant material to start new pothos plants for yourself or to share with your plant loving friends.

Make the cuttings each a few inches long, and be sure you include a leaf or two (the nodes where leaf meets stem will produce new roots) on each cutting.

The cuttings can be kept in a clear glass container of water until roots form, at which time they can be moved into pots of loose organic potting soil.

Or, dip the ends of the cuttings into some rooting growth hormone and place them directly into the potting soil.

Pothos doesn’t need or want full direct sunlight which can, in fact, burn the leaves. This preference for low light conditions or filtered indirect sunlight makes the plant perfect for indoor use in your home or office.

This attractive plant also adds oxygen to the air and helps eliminate pollutants.

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